How to Tightly Fit an Antique Door



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Ask This Old House general contractor Tom Silva uses multiple techniques to make an antique, drafty door weathertight

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Time: 3-4 hours

Cost: $100

Skill Level: Moderate

Tools List for Fitting an Antique Door:
Plumb bob
Measuring tape
Chalk line
Chisel
Hammer
Shoulder plane
Palm sander
Scribe
Drill
Screwdriver
Router
Clamps
Track saw
Utility knife
Speed square
Corner-grooving tool

Shopping List:
Automatic weather-stripping
Corner-groove weather-stripping
Wood glue
1×6” lumber

Steps:
1. Attach the plumb bob to the top of the door and pull the weight to the bottom of the door.
2. Use a measuring tape to determine if there’s a difference between the distance of the plumb bob string at the top of the door and the distance from the string to the bottom of the door. If there is, the door is out of plumb.
3. Remove the door from the hinges.
4. To make the door plumb, hold a chalk line at the edge of the jamb on the end of the door that had the larger measurement. Put the other end of the chalk line at the other end of the jamb inwards the difference between to the two measurements. Snap the string to make a line.
5. Inspect the jamb and remove any nails.
6. Chisel out any wood that lies outside the chalk line on the jamb. Smooth it out with a shoulder plane and a palm sander. Keep an eye out for any other nails that might have been missed to protect the chisel from being damaged.
7. Repeat this process on the jamb on the other side of the door.
8. Use the scribe to measure the distance between the hinge and other end of the door, and transfer that measurement to the jamb by holding the scribe against the new stop just chiseled out.
9. Chisel out a new mortise for the door hinge based on the mark from the scribe.
10. Drill new holes for the hinges and screw them back into the jamb.
11. To make the door the correct length, make two rabbet cuts on each side of the bottom of the door.
12. Attach two pieces of the 1×6” lumber to the rabbeted door using wood glue.
13. Instead of filling the gap in the middle, install automatic weather-stripping to ensure a tight seal. Follow the instructions provided with the weather-stripping to screw in the mounting bracket and slide in the weather-stripping.
14. Clamp everything together and allow the glue to dry.
15. Once the glue is dry, cut the door to length and width using the track saw.
16. Give the filler pieces on the door a good sanding with the palm sander.
17. To make the filler pieces blend in with the rest of the door, use a utility knife and a speed square to extend score marks from the door to the filler pieces.
18. Use the corner-grooving tool to cut into the corners on all sides of the jamb.
19. Insert the corner-groove weather-stripping into the channels.
20. Rehang the door.

Resources:
To fix the door, Tom addressed multiple issues: the door was out of plumb, it was too short, and it was drafty.

To make the door plumb, Tom used a plumb bob, a chalk line, a chisel, and a shoulder plane. These can be found at home centers. It’s also possible to use power tools to shave back the jamb, but hand tools will be required at the top and bottom of the door where those tools wouldn’t fit.

The tools Tom used to lengthen the door, including the wood, clamps, wood glue, and hammer, can also be found at home centers.

Tom also improved the weather-stripping to make the door more weathertight. The automatic door bottom, the corner-groove weather-stripping, and the corner-grooving tool and associated bits are all manufactured by Conservation Technology (
Ask This Old House TV
Homeowners have a virtual truckload of questions for us on smaller projects, and we’re ready to answer. Ask This Old House solves the steady stream of home improvement problems faced by our viewers—and we make house calls! Ask This Old House features some familiar faces from This Old House, including Kevin O’Connor, general contractor Tom Silva, plumbing and heating expert Richard Trethewey, and landscape contractor Roger Cook.
 
This Old House releases new segments every Sunday, Monday, Wednesday and Friday.
 
Keywords: This Old House, How-to, home improvement, DIY, tom silva, door, entry, antique, install, woodworking, ask this old house

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Broan EZ Fit Installation – Ventilation Fans



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Before you begin, be sure switch off the power at the service panel and lock or mark the disconnect with a warning tag.

Begin by removing your EZ Fit fan from the packaging and punch out the installation template.

Prepare the housing by loosening the two blower screws.

Unplug the blower and remove it from the housing before you remove the wiring cover inside the housing.

Be sure that the metal housing of the fan you are replacing is no larger than 8 inches by 8 ¼ inches.

With the old grill removed, you should be able to see on which side the housing is attached to a joist. Find and mark the center point of the old fan along that side.

Position the template so its arrow aligns with the center mark you just made. Now trace around the template with a pencil.

Use a drywall saw to cut out the ceiling along the lines you just marked making sure not to cut existing ducting or wiring. With the power turned off, remove the old fan before you disconnect the wiring and the ductwork.

Next you’ll lift the new fan housing into the opening. The large rectangular opening inside the housing should face the existing duct.

Tighten the four EZLock™ Tabs with a Phillips screwdriver. The ceiling material must be a minimum of one half inch thick in order for the clamps to tighten securely.

If you use a drill/driver DO NOT over-tighten the clamps. You could damage the ceiling and prevent proper installation.

If the existing ductwork is 4 inch material, pull it into the housing and connect it to the 4 inch duct connector with duct tape. Rigid duct may need to be cut to fit before the housing goes in. For 3 inch ductwork, use the 4 inch to 3 inch reducer provided.

Next, move the 4 inch duct connector into the opening and fasten it to the housing with the tab and screw provided. Attach a UL approved connector to the wiring plate and thread the house wiring through it. Tighten the connector.

Now you can connect the wires inside the wiring cover to the house wires with EZConnect™ Wire Connectors according to the wiring diagram in your instructions.

Essentially, you want black to black, white to white and ground to ground. The ground wires may be either bare, or green.

When these connections are secure, connect the wiring cover with the screws that held it before.

Now you can plug in the blower and re-install it.

Tighten the two screws that secure it in place.

To install the grill, squeeze the two springs and insert them into the slots in the blower.

Then press the grill up tight against the ceiling.

Your EZ Fit fan installation is complete.

NuTone EZ Fit Features and Benefits – Ventilation Fans



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The NuTone EZ Fit line of Ventilation Fans makes replacing an existing fan easier than ever because everything can be done from the room side, with no attic access required.

Each fan features 4 EZLock™ tabs that simply twist to clamp the housing directly to ceiling material.

The unit’s height is just 5 inches, which allows for easy installation in 2 X 6 framed ceilings. And you can even connect the duct without attic access. Plus, the included reducer allows connection to either 4 inch OR 3 inch duct.

The permanently lubricated motor is up to 50 percent more powerful and up to 70 percent quieter, with a sound quality rating up to twice that of typical fans. Plus, it uses very little power, so every EZ Fit fan is ENERGY STAR qualified. And like every Broan-NuTone product, the EZ Fit Ventilation Fan is designed to last, providing you with years of trouble-free service.

Broan EZ Fit Features and Benefits – Ventilation Fans



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The Broan EZ Fit line of Ventilation Fans makes replacing an existing fan easier than ever because everything can be done from the room side, with no attic access required.

Each fan features 4 EZLock™ tabs that simply twist to clamp the housing directly to ceiling material.

The unit’s height is just 5 inches, which allows for easy installation in 2 X 6 framed ceilings. And you can even connect the duct without attic access. Plus, the included reducer allows connection to either 4 inch OR 3 inch duct.

The permanently lubricated motor is up to 50 percent more powerful and up to 70 percent quieter, with a sound quality rating up to twice that of typical fans. Plus, it uses very little power, so every EZ Fit fan is ENERGY STAR qualified. And like every Broan-NuTone product, the EZ Fit Ventilation Fan is designed to last, providing you with years of trouble-free service.

Click Flow Range with Faster Fit Connectors – Scolmore



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Flow – Simple Connectivity and Control.

With the emphasis now on flexibility and ease of installation many building design projects are now focusing on products and services that can adapt to changing legislation, energy efficiency and the ever changing needs of the client.

For more information please visit scolmore.com

Air Purifier for Gyms, Health Centers, Dance Studio, Cross Fit, Pilates Studio & Yoga Class



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Fresh news to all Gym freaks and this puts all your worries about polluted indoor air at bay. Our world-class 7stage filter technology Air Concept Air Purifier ensures very effective air purification across your gym. Now you usher in fresh and hustle out again fresh. Buy an Air Concept Air Purifier today and get a fresh breath of air. (Call 1800 1200 0 3600 or visit airconcept.co.in)

Antiquarian Restoration – Too much content to fit this tittle Box – Antikvarisk Restaurering



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0:23 Why I don’t use glass-fibre insulation
5:59 Dating the building (the deeds say 1912 but I find proof it is older)
11:24 Using Moss in walls
14:31 Line-scribing to fit an uneven floor.
19:25 A dividing beam in the ceiling
25:51 Hand made paint
35:32 Painting with hand made Linseed oil-paint

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©Lucas Richard Stephens / Bono 2019